Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

New Accounting Pronouncements

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New Accounting Pronouncements
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018
New Accounting Pronouncements and Changes in Accounting Principles [Abstract]  
New Accounting Pronouncements
NEW ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS:
Adoption of New Accounting Pronouncements
In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued an update that superseded most revenue recognition guidance, as well as certain cost recognition guidance. The update, together with other clarifying updates, requires that the recognition of revenue related to the transfer of goods or services to customers reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The update also requires additional qualitative and quantitative disclosures about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenues and cash flows arising from customer contracts, including significant judgments and changes in judgments, and information about contract balances and performance obligations.
Quanta adopted the new revenue recognition guidance using the modified retrospective transition method effective January 1, 2018, applying the guidance to contracts that were not substantially complete as of such date. Quanta’s financial results for reporting periods after January 1, 2018 have been and will be presented under the new guidance, while financial results for prior periods will continue to be reported in accordance with the prior guidance and Quanta’s historical accounting policy. The net cumulative adjustment resulting from adoption was a $1.8 million reduction to retained earnings as of January 1, 2018, which primarily related to certain contracts that are now accounted for as a single performance obligation but were previously accounted for separately for revenue recognition purposes.
Quanta has not experienced significant changes to the pattern of revenue recognition for its contracts, the identification of contracts and performance obligations or the measurement of variable consideration. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2018, the impact related to the adoption of the new revenue recognition guidance on revenues, contract assets and contract liabilities was immaterial. Quanta has also expanded its discussion in Note 2 above to address the quantitative and qualitative disclosure requirements of the new revenue recognition standard.
In January 2016, the FASB issued an update that addresses certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation, and disclosure of financial instruments to provide users of financial statements with more decision-useful information. This update requires equity investments (except those accounted for under the equity method of accounting or those that result in consolidation of the investee) to be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income. However, an entity may choose to measure equity investments that do not have readily determinable fair values at cost minus impairment, if any, plus or minus changes resulting from observable price changes in orderly transactions for the identical or a similar investment of the same issuer. Quanta adopted the new standard effective January 1, 2018. Quanta’s equity investments that are within the scope of this update do not have readily determinable fair values. Accordingly, Quanta continues to measure these investments at cost less any impairments and also considers changes resulting from any observable price changes as described above. The new standard is not expected to have a material impact on Quanta’s consolidated financial statements in the near-term based on the equity investments held at the time of adoption.
In August 2016, the FASB issued an update intended to standardize the classification of certain transactions on the statements of cash flows. These transactions include contingent consideration payments made after a business combination, proceeds from the settlement of insurance claims, proceeds from the settlement of corporate-owned life insurance policies and distributions received from equity method investments. The new standard requires application using a retrospective transition method. Quanta adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2018, and the changes did not have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
In October 2016, the FASB issued an update that requires a reporting entity to recognize the tax expense from the sale of an asset in the seller’s tax jurisdiction when the transfer occurs, even though the pre-tax effects of that transaction are eliminated in consolidation. Any deferred tax asset that arises in the buyer’s jurisdiction should be recognized at the time of the transfer. The new guidance does not apply to intra-entity transfers of inventory. The income tax consequences from the sale of inventory from one member of a consolidated entity to another will continue to be deferred until the inventory is sold to a third party. Quanta adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2018 utilizing the modified retrospective method, and the changes did not have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
In November 2016, the FASB issued an update intended to standardize the classification of restricted cash and cash equivalents transactions on the statement of cash flows. The new guidance requires net cash withdrawn from (deposited to) restricted cash to be removed from investing activities. Additionally, restricted cash balances for each period are included with “Cash and cash equivalents” in order to obtain beginning and ending balances for condensed consolidated statement of cash flow purposes, and any activity between “Cash and cash equivalents” and restricted cash is no longer reported on Quanta’s consolidated statements of cash flows. Quanta adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2018 utilizing the retrospective transition method, and the changes did not have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements. See Note 12 for reconciliations of “Cash and cash equivalents” and restricted cash.
In January 2017, the FASB issued an update intended to clarify whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions or disposals of assets or businesses. When substantially all of the fair value of the gross assets acquired or disposed of is concentrated in a single identifiable asset or group of similar identifiable assets, the asset or group is not a business. The update requires, among other things, that to be considered a business, a set of assets and activities must include, at a minimum, an input and a substantive process that together significantly contribute to the ability to create output. Additionally, the update removes the evaluation of whether a market participant could replace missing elements in order to consider the set of assets and activities a business, provides more stringent criteria for sets without outputs and narrows the definition of output. Quanta adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2018 utilizing the prospective transition method, and the changes did not materially impact its consolidated financial statements.
In May 2017, the FASB issued an update providing guidance about which changes to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award require an entity to apply modification accounting. A modification should be accounted for unless the following characteristics of the award are unchanged: the fair value, the vesting conditions and the classification as an equity instrument or a liability instrument. Quanta adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2018 using the prospective transition method, and the changes did not materially impact its consolidated financial statements.
Accounting Standards Not Yet Adopted
In February 2016, the FASB issued an update that requires the recognition of operating lease right-of-use assets and the corresponding lease liabilities on the balance sheet. The new standard is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. In July 2018, the FASB issued an update that provides entities a choice between the previously required modified retrospective transition method and another transition method that allows entities to initially apply the new standard at the adoption date and recognize a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings in the period of adoption. While Quanta continues to evaluate the effect of this standard on its consolidated financial statements, it is anticipated that adoption will result in a significant amount of lease right-of-use assets and corresponding lease liabilities being recorded on its consolidated balance sheets. Quanta has established a cross-functional team to implement this standard and is in the process of evaluating arrangements that will be subject to the standard, is implementing software to meet the reporting and disclosure requirements of the standard and is assessing the impact of the standard on its processes and internal controls. The standard is not expected to have a material impact on Quanta’s compliance with the financial covenants under its senior secured revolving current credit facility. Quanta will adopt this guidance effective January 1, 2019 and will apply the transition method that allows the recognition of a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings on such date.
In June 2016, the FASB issued an update that will change the way companies measure credit losses for most financial assets and certain other instruments that are not measured at fair value through net income. The update will require companies to use an “expected loss” model for instruments measured at amortized cost and to record allowances for available-for-sale debt securities rather than reduce the carrying amounts. The update will also require disclosure of information regarding how a company developed its allowance, including changes in the factors that influenced management’s estimate of expected credit losses and the reasons for those changes. Companies will apply this standard’s provisions as a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the guidance is effective. The new standard is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Quanta is currently evaluating the potential impact of this authoritative guidance on its consolidated financial statements and will adopt this guidance effective January 1, 2020.
In August 2017, the FASB issued an update which amends and simplifies existing guidance for presenting the economic effects of risk management activities in the financial statements. The update is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The amended presentation and disclosure guidance is required only prospectively, but certain amendments, if applicable, could require a cumulative-effect adjustment. Quanta is evaluating the impact of this new standard on its consolidated financial statements and will adopt the new standard effective January 1, 2019; however, as of June 30, 2018, Quanta had no hedging relationships outstanding.